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Posts Tagged ‘Canonical’

The sun will come out tomorrow . . .

August 11, 2013 4 comments

It’s getting late in the game and the team you’re rooting for is down by a significant margin. As a San Francisco Giants fan, this season I know that feeling all too well. With a week and a half left in Canonical’s Indiegogo campaign, we’re now starting to see posts on social media like this one on Google+ that starts out: “For the sake of the linux community, and the future of open source hardware projects, please help Ubuntu Edge become real.”

mark_32milWith 11 days left and with the total so far at the mid-$9 million level, it appears it’s going to take either a “Hail Mary” pass by someone with mile-deep pockets or a room full of Michael Bloombergs with cash-filled briefcases to make the $32 million goal originally sought by Canonical. Still, $9 million plus — or whatever Canonical ends up with after the deadline — is nothing to sneeze at, and we trust that it will be put to good use when it comes to developing Ubuntu Edge.

[Edit: I know the Indiegogo campaign is set up so that if Canonical doesn't make the goal, then they don't get the money. I would like to think, however, that if people are that serious about putting up money and/or ordering hardware, they should be able to do so and that Canonical should take this into account going forward.]

By a number of metrics, though, the Ubuntu Edge campaign is a short-term success by a wide margin, no matter what the final tally show 11 days from now.

But long-term success? Let’s see how — or even if — Canonical delivers on Ubuntu Edge.

Meanwhile, back at Google+ . . . Aaron Seigo, in his normally straightforward and reasonable manner borne of an eloquence and wisdom that make him one of the true leaders of FOSS, weighs in with some comments in this thread.

Since he says this far better than I would, I’ll let Aaron drive here. He says in his first comment:

“(… someone mentioned me, so here I come :)

“Yes, open hardware is very hard; just getting properly open software on consumer grade electronics that you can manufacturer your own devices with is not easy. We’re finally there with the Vivaldi tablet we’ve been working on for a year now; we’re working out the last Q/A issues on the factory lines (so many parts that have to go together just perfectly), but I can definitely tell you that it is not easy.

“Due to this, I respect that Canonical has decided to take on such a project.

“The biggest concern I have is exactly what the +Mehdi Zakaria Benadel alludes to in his original post:

“Some people have become convinced that the Edge is critical to the future of open hardware, and so if the funding fails to materialize they may take this is a signal that Free software and open consumer electronics just aren’t meant to be.

“Thankfully, that is not the case. Canonical is not all of Linux or Free software; Ubuntu is not all of Linux or Free software. Even if Canonical does not succeed in this, others will persist on and we will succeed.

“If the Edge succeeds then we can rejoice together. At this point that looks unlikely, however. If it does not succeed then we simply need to move on and not let one failure by one company convince us that the sky has fallen in.

“Companies and projects fail all the time, that’s just how it is. Fortunately enough also succeed to keep progress moving. This is true not only in Free software, but all areas of effort in this world.

“This is also why it is so important that we do not somehow become deluded into thinking that the future of Free software rests on the shoulder of Canonical or Ubuntu. We need to put our eggs in multiple baskets and build no single points of failure in our community, or in our minds.

“Regardless of how this pans out, everyone will learn a lot from it.”

Exactly, Aaron.

lumberghEleven days from now, the Indiegogo campaign will wrap up and the final tally will be announced 12 days hence. Chances are that it will not be $32 million. Regardless of how much is collected, it will be, at best, something that Canonical can build on and, again, the wider FOSS world surely shares the hope that it is something on which Canonical follows through.

What it won’t be is the beginning of the end for the FOSS paradigm, which will continue to thrive regardless of what happens with Ubuntu Edge.

So cue up the musical “Annie” and enjoy your Sunday.

Oh, before I forget: This blog mentioned Ubuntu Edge and, of course, it’s time for the windup and the pitch.

Want to give some money to projects that really make a difference? Give instead to:

Reglue (especially Reglue, which is creating a new generation of FOSS users as you read this sentence)

Partimus (bringing Linux boxes to classrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area, or any other project like it)

CrunchBang (or your favorite distro, if it accepts donations)

Tux4Kids (the folks who bring you Tux Paint and other educational FOSS programs across platforms)

Or even taking a look at the list of projects at Software for the Public Interest and choose one of those.

[Blogger's Note: FOSS Force, which provides news and commentary on all things Free/Open Source, currently has a poll running to rank the Best Personal Linux or FOSS Blog, in which they include Larry the Free Software Guy. All the blogs are excellent, but I shamelessly admit that this is an appeal to vote for me. So if you like this blog, use one of your two first-round votes -- yes, you have two votes to vote for two blogs (not two of the same one) -- to vote for Larry the Free Software Guy. If you don't like this blog, cast your votes for two of the others: I'd vote for Ken Starks' Blog of Helios or write in Jim Eriksen's Jim's 2011 blog at http://jims2011.blogspot.com (write-ins must be accompanied by the URL). And whomever you choose in the privacy of the digital voting booth, thank you for voting!]

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

The Reglue $32,000 Campaign Challenge

July 29, 2013 14 comments

At this point, the Ubuntu Edge Indiegogo campaign for $32 million is just north of $7 million.

At this point, the Reglue Indiegogo campaign for $32,000 is just south of $4,000.

And that’s after Mark Shuttleworth kicked in $1,000 to the Reglue campaign (a sincere thank you for that one, Mark; sincerely and seriously — no snark).

If you do the math, $32,000 is 0.1 percent — one-tenth of one percent — of $32 million. But I hate fractions and decimal points, so I’m going to round up the figure to, oh, 10 percent by throwing out the decimal point and swapping the digits instead.

With this 10 percent factor, I hereby throw down the gauntlet to each and every Ubuntu Edge contributor.

Here’s the challenge: You bought an Ubuntu Edge phone for $600 or $800 already? Great. If you can afford to spend that much on a phone, you can kick in 10 percent of that to the Reglue Indiegogo campaign to help underprivileged kids around Austin, Texas, get Linux boxes, as well as providing the upkeep and day-to-day operations of nine computer learning labs in and around Austin.

You didn’t buy a phone, but you believe in Canonical’s project enough to place some money down? Fantastic. Now, how about about donating 10 percent of what you gave to them to a project that not only provides the aforementioned Linux boxes and computer labs, but also provides Internet connectivity to the most needy of their clients?

That’s all I’m asking, Ubunteros: 10 percent of what you gave to Ubuntu Edge.

[This is not to say that those who didn't donate to Ubuntu Edge are exempt. If you are a good Fosstafarian and want to see the good that Reglue does succeed, by all means donate.]

Bonus: Here’s your chance to make me eat proverbial crow, Ubuntu fans. I’ll sit in the digital sideshow dunk tank and let you throw baseballs to put me in the water. If you donated to BOTH Ubuntu Edge and Reglue — your Reglue donation must be at least 10 percent of your Ubuntu Edge donation — you have accepted the challenge, so post a comment to this blog with your real name and the amount of your donations to each. Upon my confirmation of both donations, I will comment back with a statement and/or observation to each and every comment about what Ubuntu is/has been doing right and/or something positive about Ubuntu.

Double bonus: Want to see me eat my words for an entire month? How’s this? If Reglue makes its goal of $32,000 — with or without the help of Ubuntu users and fans — I’ll write a month of Sundays of Ubuntu blog posts extolling the glory that is the adjective-and-the-animal-with-the-same-letter. That’s a month of Larry the Free Software Guy blogs, which run on Sundays, accenting the greatness that is Ubuntu. The top four Ubuntu Edge/Reglue donors (top Ubuntu Edge donors to Reglue, that is) each get to pick one of the four topics for four consecutive Sunday LtFSG blog items singing the glowing praises of Canonical, Ubuntu or both.

[Looking at the proverbial scoreboard, the top donor in this category so far would be Mark Shuttleworth. How about it, Mark? Think you can rally your troops?]

There you go, folks. You have a few weeks left. Feeling up to the task?

=====

Oops, I did it again: Every time I mention Ubuntu Edge in a blog post, I am going to mention this. I still strongly advocate for folks to donate to the following groups instead of giving millions to Canonical. Give instead to:

Reglue (especially Reglue, for reasons mentioned above)

Partimus (bringing Linux boxes to classrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area)

CrunchBang (or your favorite distro, if it accepts donations)

Tux4Kids (the folks who bring you Tux Paint and other educational FOSS programs across platforms)

Or even taking a look at the list of projects at Software for the Public Interest and choose one of those.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Why it sucks to be rich

July 28, 2013 2 comments

Before we get underway today, it bears mentioning in the face of the Ubuntu Forums cracking — down for seven days now, guys . . . it’s that big a problem? — that we know who has root, or at least Mark Shuttleworth said so when he wrote, “Don’t trust us? Erm, we have root. You do trust us with your data already” in his blog item here from September of last year.

So, can we get a show of hands? Still trust him with your data?

OK, perhaps that was hasty, and I take it back. I know it must really suck to be rich; to have the one-percenter problems that I could not begin to imagine. I understand the wealthy don’t have the same concerns as those of us who have too much month at the end of the money while splitting hairs between paying utility bills and buying enough ramen for the rest of the week.

But mac-and-Velveeta problems pale in comparison to what Mark Shuttleworth has had to go through recently. Apparently, Mark has had to lawyer up and sue the South African government to have South Africa’s exchange control system declared unconstitutional, as well as having the High Court in Pretoria set aside a levy of over 250 million rand he had to pay to get some of his assets out of the country in 2009, and order the SA Reserve Bank to return the money.

According to the iafrica.com article linked above, “[Shuttleworth] had assets worth over R4.27 billion in South Africa when he emigrated, but transferred the assets out of the country in 2008 and 2009, each time paying a 10 percent levy.”

Ouch. Ten percent of your fortune stays behind when you leave your country for a tax haven like the Isle of Man? That’s truly not right, and on principle I would certainly agree that Shuttleworth deserves his money. No lie and no sarcasm: Mark definitely did the right thing in filing suit.

That was in April. The Durban reported on July 19 that the High Court in Pretoria has struck down Shuttleworth’s case. While The Durban reports the court “on Thursday [July 18] dismissed Shuttleworth’s application to strike down the whole of Section 9 of the Currency and Exchange Act and all of the Exchange Control Regulations as unconstitutional,” they did find parts of it unconstitutional, but most importantly it appears that the 250 million rand is lost for good to the South African government.

That certainly must have put a damper on the Ubuntu Edge Indegogo campaign rollout on the Monday following the ruling. As an aside, this is what 250 million rand looks like in U.S. dollars: At roughly 0.102 dollars to the rand, it comes out to roughly $25.6 million, just $6.4 million short of the $32 million that Ubuntu Edge is seeking in their campaign ending on Aug. 21.

Pity, since if the South African court had ruled in Shuttleworth’s favor and this windfall was returned to him, imagine how far along the Ubuntu Edge Indiegogo campaign would be if he donated some, most or all of it.

Sorry about losing the suit, Mark — you truly got hosed. And seriously, good luck with the campaign.

===

But, hey, I said “Ubuntu Edge” again: Every time I blog and Ubuntu Edge is mentioned, I am going to repeat the following from a previous blog. I still strongly advocate for folks to donate to the following groups instead of giving millions to a company like Canonical which doesn’t care much about anything other than itself. Give instead to:

Reglue (especially Reglue, which is creating a new generation of FOSS users as you read this sentence)

Partimus (bringing Linux boxes running Ubuntu to classrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area, or any other project like it)

CrunchBang (or your favorite distro, if it accepts donations)

Tux4Kids (the folks who bring you Tux Paint and other educational FOSS programs across platforms)

Or even taking a look at the list of projects at Software for the Public Interest and choose one of those.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

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