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Posts Tagged ‘Fedora’

But wait . . .

May 26, 2014 3 comments

To be honest, I’m not really obsessed with this topic; at least I’m not paying as much attention to Ubuntu/Canonical’s replacing Jono Bacon as people think I am. But a wide variety of people — from those who consider me detestable scum (single file, folks, one at a time) to those who either are, or think they are, giving me inside information — have not been shy about sharing what they know or what they suspect.

You might think that I would say, “Stop,” but it’s all somewhat interesting, in the same way watching two hockey players converging on a puck near the board is interesting. Interesting, but not terribly important.

But one thing that popped up on the radar late last night/early this morning is that Jono Bacon could be “irreplaceable” in Canonical’s eyes. That is, the scenario presented is that Jono’s position would not be filled, and the “community leader” would be a committee with the newly minted Ubuntu Community Liaison position (previously referred to as the “monkey boy” position) being the go-between between the Inner Party at Canonical and the Outer Party of what’s left of the community.

Draw your own conclusions about how this particular scenario translates to Ubuntu’s commitment to community.

But it’s an interesting scenario, to be sure: Certainly better than the one where Mark Shuttleworth takes over as Community Leader as a cost-cutting move (don’t laugh, that was sent to me as a scenario).

One more thing. To those who laughably think they’re getting a dig in by asking me why I’m not focusing on who’s replacing Robyn Bergeron as the Fedora Project Leader, here’s why I’m not really too concerned about that.

If I were a betting man, my money would be on Tom Callaway to be the next Fedora Project Leader. He is a natural choice, and he’ll be a fantastic choice to lead Fedora, a distro that on every level, in every facet of development and community, does things right.

Remember where you heard it first.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Meanwhile, back at the blog . . .

April 16, 2014 Leave a comment

First things first: I hate being a statistic (I’m truly sorry, Mr. President). But as of a few Fridays ago, I have become a minuscule uptick — or at least, in a very infinitesimally small way, preventing a downturn — in the U.S. unemployment rate. In short, the Santa Cruz Sentinel laid me off after 11 years of editing, which capped a 37-year run in various media, mostly in newspapers.

But never mind. Let’s just leave this at “unemployment sucks,” and move on, shall we?

I bring this up to explain my absence. What I have been doing — NSA take note and pass this on to the Labor Department — is looking for work and hatching some other diabolical schemes, not the least of which is reviving the Lindependence Project to do more events this year. Film at 11.

Now with more free time than I can eat, I can do things like write this blog once again on a regular basis. With this additional time when I’m not looking for work (hello, California Employment Development Department), I also have time to squirrel around with some hardware and software in the home lab which, as you may recall, is dubbed The Jungle Room.

Elvis fans can explain that one to you.

Anyway, while cleaning the house the other day, I found a IBM ThinkPad T60 in a box, partially disassembled, and needing a hard drive. More cleaning later, I found a hard drive for it — such is life in Casa Cafiero, because where people find change between the cushions of their couch, I usually find things like a 1 GB laptop memory chip (don’t laugh, that really happened).

In my backpack, I had a Fedora 20 disk from SCALE 12X so I assembled the T60 and after some wailing and gnashing of teeth with the newly found hard drive (I love GParted to death — honest. And I will name the rest of my children GParted, if it ever comes to that), I installed the Fedora 20 “Desktop Edition.”

Translation: “Desktop Edition” means GNOME. It has always been a mystery why they didn’t just call it Fedora $NUMBER GNOME, but they don’t. It’s Desktop Edition, wink wink, nudge nudge, say no more. I’ve written about the current GNOME desktop before — in each case, I believe I hated it — but I thought I’d give it another try.

The jury has reached a verdict, your honor: It’s still not for me.

I’m not doing a swan dive onto the dogpile currently burying GNOME in the wake of its recent financial problems. On the contrary: If I can say something positive about it, setting up the desktop the way you want it seems to be easier than it was when I originally tried it years ago. Also, this may be damning by faint praise, but at least GNOME 3.x doesn’t call Amazon saying, “Hey, here’s Larry’s data” (and I think that’s because, well, “erm . . .” they don’t have root, and I trust them moreso than the U-laden distro).

So I’ll be changing this back to something with real, honest-to-$DIETY icons and a desktop environment, which will bring me to KDE or Xfce. Also, I think I’m going to start using Fedora again a little more regularly.

It’s good to be back.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Categories: Fedora, GNOME, KDE, linux, Linux, Xfce Tags: , , , , ,

Fedora does it right, again

January 12, 2014 5 comments

There’s a lot of news coming out of Raleigh lately, and you know for sure that I have a lot to say — good things, of course — about Red Hat and CentOS joining forces. But for now, perhaps the most informed commentary on this issue comes from Karsten Wade in his personal blog.

So if you can hold that thought, I want to touch on another issue before it gets too late.

You’ve read this here before, but it bears repeating: The six-month distribution release cycle is a myth. For whatever reason, tying a distro’s development to a set date twice on the calendar, rather than letting the development process work out the details of when a distro should be released, leads to unrealistic expectations, at the very least. At worst, it results in broken pieces in the new release.

TL;DR: Distros should be released when they’re ready.

Yes, there are extremes to this rule, and we’re looking at you, Debian. But the fact remains that headaches for developers and users can be avoided by letting the process take its course and allow a reasonable amount of time to provide for a solid distro. This is surely not too much to ask, in contrast to the alternative: being shackled by a six-month cycle that geometrically increases pressure to release with a lesser regard to quality in order to make the deadline.

So it comes with a great deal of surprise — the good kind — that the Fedora Project’s Jaroslav Resnik wrote in his blog that as the schedule-wrangler, he gets asked the question. Letting him describe it, “Is Fedora 21 going to be released in the old model way, or new one? Hard to answer right now. But there’s one date – F21 is not going to be released earlier than in August (and I’d say late August).”

His blog item outlines why we’re not going to get Fedora 21 in May or June — as the six-month cycle would have it — and the reasons why are rational and commendable. In fact, there’s surely no harm in waiting for certain programs vital to the distro be ready before unleashing it on the public. Jaroslav’s explanation provides a good insight into why it’s good to not be bound by the calendar.

Plus — and this is pure speculation — if Fedora has something special for Fedora 21, I for one am glad to give them a little more time to provide it.

So thank you, Fedora, for getting it right yet again.

One regrettable item related to this issue is that the Fedora Project dropped its semi-annual brouhaha otherwise known as the release name discussion and election. Fedora will no longer have an accompanying release names with each subsequent number, which is unfortunate because it was one of the fun things to look forward to with each release. My guess is that Beefy Miracle had put this process off the rails, though it’s good that Schrodinger’s Cat got in before they curtailed the names.

See you next week, if not sooner.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Categories: Fedora, Fosstafarian, linux, Linux Tags: ,

Ch-ch-ch-changes

January 11, 2014 3 comments

OK, so now that it’s a new year and with new vigor, I would like to make some changes to the whole writing schedule thing, and maybe — oh, I don’t know — add a blog or two to Larry’s League of Extraordinary Blogs.

So starting this week, we’re going to adhere to a strict schedule (honest) every week going forward that is going to look like this:

Sunday: Larry the Free Software Guy

Yep, the commentary, punditry, and humor you’ve all grown to love — or hate (looking at you, Mark S.) — will come to you neatly wrapped on Sundays. A pointed opinion on all things FOSS-related will continue to be this blog’s bread and butter. And bacon. And cinnamon rolls.

Tuesday: Larry the CrunchBang Guy

Yep, CrunchBang, the small Debian-based distro which makes a big impact on just about everyone who uses it, is still on some of my hardware and, as such, I’ll still be writing about it. That will be on Tuesdays. But on Thursdays . . . ah, Thursdays . . .

Thursday: Fosstafarian

If you’re reading this, chances are you’re a Fosstafarian — we all believe in the power of good behind Free/Open Source Software (and Hardware). We also know that there is more that unites us — Free Software and Open Source advocates alike — than divides us. So while the Free Software Guy tackles particular issues and foibles in FOSS circles, this blog takes on a more philosophical — and, yes, an almost religious — look at what makes us do what we do. Which leaves us the fourth, and other new blog, called . . .

Saturday: Larry the Korora Guy

For years — no, for decades — I’ve always been several steps behind in the technological race, never having the newest hardware to run the latest, greatest software. Until now. Now that I have a pretty decent laptop with more than one processor and more memory than I can eat, I’ve decided to go back to my Fedora roots. I have a history with Korora — I had given it a test-run back in the day when it had two A’s at the end of the name — and recently I’ve tried it with the KDE desktop. So since I’m using it, I might as well write about it.

So there you have it. Pick a day. Have a read. See you then.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Tuesday afternoon

December 17, 2013 Leave a comment

Well, forgive me, folks — there are a multiplicity of reasons for the delay of this blog item, but allow me the excuse of waiting for the release of Fedora 20 as one reason for writing this on Tuesday instead of on Sunday.

More importantly, however, I can also gleefully blame the delay of this item on this other, more important, factor: The Call for Papers for the Southern California Linux Expo SCALE 12X closed Sunday night. Yours truly — along with the rest of the SCALE Team — have to go through close to 250 propsals for roughly 80-90 speaking slots for the event. No small task, but one that I wouldn’t trade anything to do. All the talk proposals I’ve read so far have been outstanding, and it’s going to be a chore-and-a-half to make the decision about who stays and who goes.

I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again — I have the best job in the world as SCALE’s Publicity Chairperson, and it’s an honor to work with the folks who put on North America’s largest community-run Linux/FOSS expo. But between now and February, things will be a little hectic in bloggerville. Consider that a warning.

Meanwhile, as mentioned and linked earlier, Fedora 20 is out and available — for those of you who want to give Heisenbug a run, feel free to do so.

Also, it may be the holiday season, but it’s not too early to register for SCALE 12X if you’re mapping out your expo-visiting plans for 2014. SCALE 12X is going to be a good one — I know I say that every year, but have I ever been wrong about this?

Not much else to report on this week, so be excellent to each other. Not because it’s the holiday season, but because it’s the right thing to do.

See you Sunday, or thereabouts.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Random Tuesday thoughts

December 3, 2013 2 comments

Not being one to let the calendar get in the way of when I post, I had a few random thoughts after visiting the normal digital hangouts and haunts during the course of an increasingly cold Tuesday. Like . . .

FOSDEM’s seeking a few good distros: Joe Brockmeier passed along to me a message about FOSDEM hosting a cross-distribution miniconference on Feb. 1-2, 2014, seeking submissions of talks, Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions, or round-table discussions from any interested representatives of Linux distributions or individuals who have a topic of interest related to Linux distributions. Got a proposal? Go here and submit it through Pentabarf, the FOSDEM proposal system (though it would be a good idea to check with Joe first — Joe outlines all of this here on his blog). Good luck in Brussels!

Test, test . . . is this thing on?: Chris Smart, the lead developer at Korora, is looking for a little help in testing Pharlap, a new driver manager for Fedora and a replacement for Jockey in the next version of Korora. Pharlap is shipping with Korora 20, and Smart hopes to get it into RPMFusion down the line, but it needs some testing. He talks about it in his blog, and if you have the time, the skills and the inclination, you might want to help out.

Unicorns, the Loch Ness Monster, Ubuntu TV: One of these things is not like the others. Oh, wait: They’re all alike. Christopher Tozzi, whom many of you know as The VAR Guy, talks to Canonical in his latest item, “Canonical: Ubuntu TV Lives, But Linux Smartphones Come First.” The definition of “life” being broad as it might be, yours truly still would like to call shenanigans with impunity on the folks from the Isle of Man. Why? Simple: Canonical featured Ubuntu TV last year (2012, for those of you keeping score at home) at CES — not a small, inexpensive venue for a coming-out party — and now Jono Bacon follows up with a quote in the article that Ubuntu TV is “still not as complete as we liked it to be” nearly two years after the fact. If Ubuntu TV lives, that’s really not much of an existence, is it?

One more thing: The Linux Journal Readers’ Choice Awards are out. Not a lot of surprises, but something that deserves special mention is Aaron Seigo reflections on KDE’s excellent showing — a leader at 30.6 percent, putting together votes for KDE and KDE Plasma — in the Desktop Environment category.

See you Sunday, if not before (and Felton LUG members, bear in mind there’s no meeting this Sunday. Enjoy the yuletide holiday instead and see you in January).

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Larry in KDE Land

November 25, 2013 7 comments

This week’s blog was supposed to be a look at the newly released Raptor provided by VSIDO, and there is a version now on the soon-to-be-delivered-to-REGLUE ThinkPad T60 (sorry for the delay, Ken). I didn’t spend as much time as I should have with this release — you’ll see why below — and I didn’t want to provide a half-baked report on what is a very solid distro.

But one is forthcoming, I promise, and any delay should not be interpreted as any dissatisfaction on my part — Terry Ganus and his crew at VSIDO are doing great things making Debian Sid work for the average Joe.

However, I fell down the rabbit hole. For the most part last week I had been playing the role of the proverbial moth to KDE’s hypothetical flame. Having spent most of the week trying to plumb the depths of the K Desktop Environment — better known by its initials KDE — and the accompanying software (of which there is much; most of it remarkably cool and some of it undeniably sanity-testing), I think I’m beginning to understand its appeal across a wide range of users.

But first, how I got here. As outlined last week, I tried and liked Korora 19.1 KDE, so much so that I installed it on a fairly powerful laptop, keeping the other laptop that I always carry with me running CrunchBang. This gives me the best of both possible Debian/Red Hat worlds in an overstuffed backpack (the aforementioned T60 stayed at home). As it turned out, my forum account on KDE.org was still active even though I hadn’t logged in since 2009.

Having hardware that could easily pull the KDE load (a very important point here, since that is not common for yours truly), I went exploring.

There are things about KDE that I find mysterious. There are things about KDE that I find inconceivable (I keep using that word: I think it means what I think it means). There are things about the software that I find both compelling and unfathomable at the same time, and I find it a huge credit to the KDE community that they keep providing this software while keeping the cats herded and moving somewhat in the same direction. With enough time, I’ve fathomed things like Dolphin — getting a hold of what it does and nodding approvingly — and KWallet, which is something I don’t really need, but I can see how others with somewhat more complicated lives can utilize it. The stick-poking care in changing and re-changing icons and desktop patterns created, over time, a confidence that increased the more I did it.

So the basis for a quality desktop environment supported with a variety of software — heck, I’ve even made my peace with Konqueror and, this time around, I actually enjoyed using Konversation until finally breaking down and going back to Irssi, which is what the cool kids use — enjoys a comfortable home with KDE and it’s a testament to its far-flung community around the globe.

But there’s one thing I find I have to mention, and I did so on the forum (though I am told that I may be appealing to deaf ears). It is the “march of the icons” on the splash screen at startup, and it’s not so much the icons themselves as much as the different size of the KDE icon in the lineup.

Here’s an example from Fedora 19 (which looks a lot like the Korora startup screen with different branding):

kde2

So we have a hard drive icon, a tools icon, a globe icon, a desktop icon all the same size, and the piece-de-resistance is a twice-the-size-of-the-others KDE icon. It reminds one of Berke Breathed’s character Bill the Cat, who had one normal eye and one that was two or three times the size of the other. Also, if memory serves, the icons were all the same size in KDE 3.5, which is the last one that I used with any consistency before finding it too resource-intensive for my old hardware.

Trivial? In the grand scheme of things, yeah. I get that if KDE wants to make a statement because they’re proud of their work, go for it, dudes, and make it stand out (thought that would not be the way I’d do it). It still looks funny to me, and I would hope that there is some consideration in KDE’s higher echelons to make this KDE icon more in line, size-wise, with the rest of them.

Meanwhile, I will keep poking and probing this desktop environment and someday — someday — I will be enlightened to the true meaning of Nepomuk.

But before that, a VSIDO reports as promised. Scout’s honor. See you next week, if not before.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

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