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Posts Tagged ‘FOSSForce.com’

Perspective: Do you have it?

August 4, 2013 7 comments

[Blogger's Note: FOSS Force, which provides news and commentary on all things Free/Open Source, currently has a poll running to rank the Best Personal Linux or FOSS Blog, in which they include Larry the Free Software Guy. All the blogs are excellent, but I shamelessly admit that this is an appeal to vote for me. So if you like this blog, use one of your two first-round votes -- yes, you have two votes to vote for two blogs (not two of the same one) -- to vote for Larry the Free Software Guy. If you don't like this blog, cast your votes for two of the others: I'd vote for Ken Starks' Blog of Helios or write in Jim Eriksen's Jim's 2011 blog at http://jims2011.blogspot.com (write-ins must be accompanied by the URL). And whomever you choose in the privacy of the digital voting booth, thank you for voting!]

Grab some coffee. Perspective is important, and you’re going to be here for awhile.

mark_32milI had been sitting on this since midweek, thinking, “Well, if I give it a few days of thought and reflection, today’s post might be a more well-rounded item than shooting from the hip.” Which, of course, is true. If there’s anything I’ve learned in blogging as Larry the Free Software Guy over the past several years, it’s that when shooting from the hip, body counts usually follow.

That said, despite a litany of questionable and debatable premises involving unwashed masses, sitting around wringing our hands (I don’t know anyone doing that, do you?) and Windows’ “success” being the result of something other than having a monopoly in the market — maybe this is all sarcasm that I missed on multiple readings? — FOSS Force’s Christine Hall somehow miraculously reaches a valid conclusion in her midweek article about Mark Shuttleworth.

Forget nitpicking about certain points Hall makes that are well off-base — Ubuntu/Canonical’s lack of contributions back to the community is widely documented, and if someone brought Cadillac blueprints to the Yugo factory, the Yugo folks would probably laugh themselves into a change of underwear before asking, “Do you realize how much it would cost to retool our factory — any factory — to make a car for which the factory was not designed?”

Never mind all that: Christine Hall is right that Mark Shuttleworth has made a solid contribution to the desktop, and it’s a contribution for which we are grateful. No one has ever disputed that. However, it’s a contribution nestled upon laurels that are well-rested upon, and one that is well past its prime. Where once it was about putting Linux in front of people, it’s now about putting Mark’s Linux — his own Ubuntu OS brand of Linux — front and center and in the public eye.

That’s how the real world works, boys and girls. We get that. It’s unfair to think that Mark Shuttleworth shouldn’t make a profit on the heavy investment he’s made. That’s not — nor has it ever been — the issue here. What actually has been front-and-center is a variety of issues including, but clearly not limited to, treating the community in a less-than-open manner, picking up the mantle of Apple’s “reality distortion field” in taking credit for things it does not deserve (Debian is part of Ubuntu’s ecosphere — really, Mark?) and repeating once again not contributing back to FOSS in a manner expected of a entity that claims to be a leader in the field. Especially contributions back to FOSS, looking at the last couple of years: If the widespread adoption of Unity, to say nothing of the wider community’s embracing Mir so far, is any indication of Ubuntu/Canonical’s contributions back to the wider FOSS world . . . oh, wait.

So Mark Shuttleworth laid the groundwork for his enterprise on the backs of trusting developers contributing to a project which started out as a community effort, and now he’s ramping it up a notch, in a corporate way, to recoup his investment.

Again — regardless of whether it’s right or wrong, whether we agree or disagree, whether or not we think it’s disingenuous of Ubuntu to eventually coerce long-time community members to become serfs to Canonical’s profit margin — we get that. That’s how this works. Deal with it.

Which brings up another interesting scenario: Let’s say Canonical is wildly successful at Ubuntu Edge, goes off on that tangent as the phone/computer-hybrid-king-of-the world and leaves the FOSS realm to — pardon the pun — its own devices. It may even change licenses, or may even become closed: Taking into account the remote, but entirely possible, page from the Steve Jobs playbook that Mark Shuttleworth may choose to close the code, making Canonical into Canonisoft.

Would we even miss them once they’re gone?

A few years ago on a road trip to Linux Fest Northwest, Red Hat’s Karsten Wade and I had a discussion around this question: If Red Hat immediately pulled the plug on Fedora (or if Red Hat just disappeared — relax, Mark, that’s not happening), would Fedora exist? Assuming that all the data for the distro existed somewhere, which it does, the community would still continue in some form. But the consensus was that Fedora would continue without Red Hat if Red Hat didn’t exist.

The same could be said for Ubuntu, if Canonical ceased to exist. Ubuntu would clearly still exist, espcially since it has the luxury of having Debian as a fallback.

So while you are chowing down on this food for thought — well, a feast for thought worthy of Henry VIII — keep in perspective that Linux and FOSS have been growing and thriving before Ubuntu came along, and it will continue to grow and thrive whether Ubuntu/Canonical stays or goes. To say nothing of that desktop/laptop Linux and FOSS will continue on its march of progress, though I’ve already addressed that here.

This blog post could end here, except there’s dessert at 140-characters-per-spoonful, thanks to a series of tweets last night with the hashtag #linuxmalaise posted by my journalistic colleague Steven Rosenberg (Steven and I both work for different newspapers the same newspaper chain, though we both blog independently of our employers). If you’re not following @passthejoe, you should.

On Saturday night, Steven posted a series of interesting tweets that you should read, starting with:

“Is it just me, or do I sense a profound malaise in the #linux world? #linuxmalaise”

Which of course segues eventually to:

“So many put so much hope into the @Ubuntu basket, and after @canonical lost its mind over the past few years … #linuxmalaise”

There are others, but you get the idea. The fact of the matter is that Steven brings up a lot of things that many won’t say. Take a look.

Meanwhile, I think #linuxmalaise is a very valid subject to be discussing, so thanks for bringing it up, Steven (and I hope a blog post on it is forthcoming).

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

I endorse this message

August 1, 2013 Leave a comment

FOSS Force, which provides news and commentary on all things Free/Open Source, currently has a poll running to rank the Best Personal Linux or FOSS Blog, in which they include Larry the Free Software Guy.

The key word here is “personal” — the commercial guys and gals who blog for larger e-publications are not part of the equation here.

I’m truly honored and humbled to be nominated. Thank you, FOSS Force.

So, if you have a minute or two to spare and are so inclined to vote for me here (he asks, groveling), I would be eternally grateful. Also, if you’re so inclined, feel free to repost this item on the social media outlet(s) of your choice, and tell your friends, family, milkman, letter carrier and everyone you meet on a daily basis to vote for me as well.

Also, in the first round you can vote for up to two blogs. This means, of course, you can vote for Larry the Free Software Guy AND another blog (but not for me twice, sadly — at least for me). Bear in mind, too, that FOSS Force has but the hammer down on multiple voting, so you can only vote for two blogs once and that’s it; as it should be.

I cast my two votes for me and for Blog of Helios, Ken Starks’ blog. It was a tough call because all the blogs listed are quality personal blogs and it’ll be interesting to see who makes it through the first round.

Bear in mind, too, that write-in votes (one of your two, of course) are also accepted. Make sure you write in the name of the blog AND the link (very important for your write-in vote to count).

For example, your write-in vote would look like the following: Larry the CrunchBang Guy http://larrythecrunchbangguy.wordpress.com

[See what I did there? :-) ]

The deadline for the first round of the poll is August 12th. Then, should I be fortunate to make the first round, you will hear more campaigning going forward.

Got a favorite? Post it below in the comments.

Thanks again, FOSS Force. See you at the polls.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

This — just this

July 14, 2013 1 comment

There are time when, I swear, I think people are channeling me. Usually, when this happens, I will point to the article and say, “This — just this.”

Christine Hall did this — just this — recently at FOSS Force. In her article about the myth of too many distros, she eloquently points out things that I have been railing about for years, while pointing out some things I hadn’t touched upon.

Read the article. Do it now — I’ll wait. Thanks for that, Christine, and good work.

Meanwhile, somewhere near Austin . . .
: Also this past week, my good friend and baseball buddy Ken “Go Astros” Starks has taken Reglue to a new level and the clock is running on an Indiegogo campaign to help finance the project.

For the few of you out there who don’t already know this, Reglue (formerly the HeliOS Project, with the HeliOS Project now Reglue’s educational wing) places Linux hardware — desktops and laptops — in the homes of underprivileged kids in the Austin, Texas, area, and they also maintain a computer lab for kids in East Austin.

(In fact, I just found this out watching the Indiegogo video on Reglue, but Reglue is an acronym for Recycled Electronics and Gnu/Linux Used for Education, in case it ever comes up in conversation)

Ken, who is in remission from cancer and has been clocking in long hours in playing catch-up, reported recently that Reglue/HeliOS Project has installed its 1,600th computer into the household of a child who could not afford one any other way.

If you’re going to give to any project this year, this would be the one. Open your wallets and purses for this one, folks.

98 shopping days left: Mark your calendars, folks. There are 98 days left until Software Freedom Day, which is Sept. 21. I’m proud to say that Felton LUG is on the bandwagon for this one this year — I just gave a presentation and rallied the troops for the project at today’s meeting and got a good response. If all goes as planned, we’ll be doing a Lindependence-style event with reps from various FOSS programs and distros at the historic Felton Presbyterian Church hall (historic insofar as it was the site of Lindependence event in 2008).

If you haven’t signed on yet for Software Freedom Day, by all means do so here. Get a team together and organize an event in your area, or if there is one in your area already, get involved. It’s really as simple as this — just this.

See you next week.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Letting the cat out of the box

June 30, 2013 7 comments

Another San Lorenzo Valley Sunday, charcoal burning everywhere . . .

A few items culled over an unreasonably hot week here in Felton — we’re talking the area being Miami with redwoods (but thankfully without humidity) — include:

Schrodinger’s Cat lives: After a go/no-go meeting last week which sided with the former, Fedora 19 “Schrodinger’s Cat” went gold and gets a non-radioactive green light for Tuesday, July 2. Curious about it, I downloaded the beta and put it on a Toshiba Satellite L455, ahem, “laptop” — a laptop if your lap is the size of, say, Andre the Giant’s — and the silver behemoth ran the beta flawlessly. As I’ve mentioned before, I don’t review distro alphas or betas because it’s akin to sticking your finger in a bowl of batter and writing about how good (or bad) the cake will be once it’s finished.

I can tell you this: I do like what Fedora has done with the install process, so much so that it was worth the wait when Fedora 18 was delayed (and I could take this opportunity to launch into why a six-month release cycle leaves a lot to be desired, but I won’t, even though I just did). In addition, I think this one will be a good one, but you’ll have to find out when I write about it next week. Get more information, and take the living cat out of the box on Tuesday, here.

The best distros: Last week, I said that a FOSSForce.com write-up a few weeks ago about what constitutes a community distro was an “uncharacteristically ludicrous article posted by the usually right-on-the-mark” site for FOSS news and commentary. As a blogger, I live in the glass house known as FOSS commentary and, regardless, I still reserve the right to throw stones. I can also admit without reservation or apology that the history of this blog is strewn with dozens of blogged eggs laid over the past several years; enough eggs to feed omelets to a small army during the course of a military campaign.

That said, I should clarify that I thought the message, not the messenger, was sorely lacking. But Christine Hall makes up for the article I slammed, and gains extra yardage on the play, by writing a great “top five” distro article which concludes — spoiler alert — with this: “Just keep in mind, there really isn’t a best Linux distro, or even a list of five best Linux distros. There’s only a best distro for you, the job you need it to do and the equipment on which you need it to operate.”

Amen to that, Christine, and thanks for reciting the Larry the Free Software Guy mantra.

Widespread adoption of Unity? Not exactly: Like FOSSForce.com, LXer.com is also one of my daily stops on the web for news and commentary. Also, more entertaining is visiting the LXer.com discussion forums — yes, that’s a reflection of how exciting my life is; deal with it (I have) — and finding some interesting morsels.

One item has an original poster bemoaning the fact that people continue to beat up on Unity. While I find it hard to agree with his premise — for a variety of reasons on several levels, Unity deserves its reputation as the pinata it has become in the tech press, with little in the way of argument against — it did prompt me to think about this question: If Unity is such an outstanding desktop environment, why hasn’t it been widely adopted by other distros?

Think about it. Personal preferences aside, a metric which speaks to how good, or not, a desktop environment is would be its adoption by other distros. So you could describe Unity as having widespread appeal if you define “widespread appeal” as being adopted by 10 — count ‘em, 10 — distros other than Ubuntu.

If you’re keeping score at home, here’s the list of distros other than Ubuntu using Unity as a default desktop environment (with DistroWatch ranking in parentheses): DreamStudio (49), The People’s Republic of China’s Ubuntu Kylin (105), Hybride Linux (108), Vinux (110), Leeenux (165); Bio-Linux (174), Ubuntu Christian Edition (188), Oz Unity (195), iQuinixOS (261), and Baltix GNU/Linux (274).

OK, so I would argue that it’s not widespread adoption, for reasons I’ve mentioned in past blog posts — the posts you couldn’t scramble and serve with toast.

Oh, and one more thing: Lindependence rides again. We’re going to take Software Freedom Day in September and make it SFD-Lindependence Felton 2012, with all the trappings of the first one. More on this as plans develop. I would urge any group — Linux User Group, FOSS software-specific user groups, even the sectarian Ubuntu LoCos — to participate in Software Freedom Day by signing up here.

See you next Sunday, if not sooner.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Halting the hiatus

June 23, 2013 1 comment

I got an e-mail from a friend and a long-time reader who observed the following:

“Hey FSG (assuming, I hope, that means Free Software Guy, though Flying Spaghetti Guy would also work for me) — You haven’t posted a blog item in over a month. Everything OK?”

Signed, “Sincerely, Mark Shuttleworth.”

OK, so I made up the last part: It wasn’t from The Mark, but someone apparently missed me enough to write.

I’ve mentioned this before: I don’t like to write just to fill space or to hear myself speak. In fact, I don’t like hearing myself speak, but that’s another subject for another time. So when I put pixels to screen, at least, I want to make sure I have something worth saying and, more importantly, something worth reading. Combine this with a life that varies in complexity from time to time (not a complaint), and I have to plead guilty to not being consistent in posting here.

Mea culpa, folks.

So to fix that, I’m setting up a schedule: Every Sunday, you’ll be seeing a Larry the Free Software Guy blog post, under the grand assumption that during the course of the week something will happen for me to comment upon by Sunday. Of course, if the lightning of inspiration strikes during the course of the week, I’ll write then as well. But count on Sundays starting next week.

Earlier today, I wrote this Larry the CrunchBang Guy post, which addresses distro-hopping — a good thing, in the grand scheme of the FOSS paradigm — and where to go to find information (hint: Go to forums, not social media). The only other thing worth mentioning over the last couple of weeks was Bruce Byfield’s reasoned observations in response to the uncharacteristically ludicrous article posted by the usually right-on-the-mark FOSSForce.com site earlier this month regarding what constitutes a community distro.

Oh, and one more thing: Fedora 19, Schrodinger’s Cat, is coming soon. Or it’s not.

See you next Sunday.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

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