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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Shuttleworth’

Looking out over the horizon

July 6, 2014 3 comments

The last couple of weeks have been filled with resume-sending, waiting by the phone for the resumes to do their trick, and a trip to Arizona for a plethora of family reasons (wife went to do some New Age thing in Sedona while daughter visited friends in Phoenix — heck, I even got a phone interview with a tech company there). But while I was driving around the Southwest, a few things crossed the proverbial radar that deserve special mention, like . . .

Congratulate me, I’m an “extremist”
: And give yourself a good pat on the back, too, because if you’re a Linux Journal reader, the NSA thinks you are an “extremist,” too. Kyle Rankin reports on the site on the eve of Independence Day — irony much? — that the publication’s readers are flagged for increased surveillance.

LJ-Extremist-red-stampThat includes — oh, I don’t know — just about everyone involved to some degree with Free/Open Source Software and Linux (and yes, Richard Stallman, that would also include GNU/Linux, too), from the noob who looked up “network security” to the most seasoned greybeard.

Rankin writes, “One of the biggest questions these new revelations raise is why. Up until this point, I would imagine most Linux Journal readers had considered the NSA revelations as troubling but figured the NSA would never be interested in them personally. Now we know that just visiting this site makes you a target. While we may never know for sure what it is about Linux Journal in particular, the Boing Boing article speculates that it might be to separate out people on the Internet who know how to be private from those who don’t so it can capture communications from everyone with privacy know-how.”

So, a quick note to our friends in the main office of the NSA in Maryland, where someone has drawn the unfortunate assignment of reading this (my apologies for not being a more exciting “extremist”) because . . . well, you know . . . I’m an “extremist” using Linux. Please pass this run-on sentence up your chain of command: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

That’s the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, in case you hadn’t noticed.

One more thing: Linux Journal webmaster Katherine Druckman (sorry, the term “webmistress,” as noted on the LJ site, needs to be thrown into the dustbin of history) says that, yeah, maybe readers are a little extreme and asks readers to join them in supporting “extremist” causes like Free/Open Source Software and hardware, online freedom, and the dissemination of helpful technical knowledge by adding the graphic featured above (it comes in red, black, or white) to your site, your social media, or wherever you deem fit.

On a more positive note . . .

Introducing Xiki: Command-line snobs, welcome to the future. In a Linux.com article, Carla Schroder introduces Xiki, an interactive and flexible command shell 10 years in the making. It’s a giant leap forward in dealing with what some consider the “black magic” of the command line, but Carla points out another, more significant, use for the software.

Carla writes, “When I started playing with Xiki it quickly became clear that it has huge potential as an interface for assistive devices such as Braille keyboards, wearable devices like high-tech glasses and gloves, prosthetics, and speech-to-text/text-to-speech engines, because Xiki seamlessly bridges the gap between machine-readable plain text and GUI functions.”

It could be the next big thing in FOSS and deserves a look.

Another day, another distro: Phoronix reported last week a peculiar development which either can be considered yet another Linux distro on the horizon or a bad joke.

According to the article, Operating System U is the new distro and the team there wants to create “the ultimate operating system.” To do that, the article continues, the distro will be based on Arch with a modified version of the MATE desktop and will use — wait for it — Wayland (putting aside for a moment that MATE doesn’t have Wayland support, but never mind that). But wait, there’s more: Operating System U also plans to modify the MATE Desktop to make it better while also developing a new component they call Startlight, which pairs the Windows Start Button with Apple’s Spotlight.

The team plans a Kickstarter campaign later this month in an attempt to raise $150,000. A noble effort or reinventing the wheel? I’d go with the latter. Our friends at Canonical have dumped a ton of Mark Shuttleworth’s money into trying to crack the desktop barrier and, at this point, they have given up to follow other form factors. Add to this an already crowded field of completely adequate and useable desktop Linux distros that would easily do what Operating System U sets out to do, and you have to wonder about the point of this exercise.

Additionally, for a team portraying itself to be so committed to open source, there seems to be a disconnect of sorts around what community engagement entails. A telling comment in the article is posted by flexiondotorg — and if it’s the person who owns that site, it’s Martin Wimpress of Hamshire, England, an Arch Linux Trusted User, a member of the MATE Desktop team, a GSoC 2014 mentor for openSUSE and one of the Ubuntu MATE Remix developers.

Martin/flexiondotorg says this: “I have a unique point of view on this. I am an Arch Linux TU and MATE developer. I am also the maintainer for MATE on Arch Linux and the maintainer for Ubuntu MATE Remix.

“None of the indivuals involved with Operating System U have approached Arch or MATE, nor contributed to either project, as far as I can tell. I’d also like to highlight that we (the MATE team) have not completed adding support for GTK3 to MATE, although that is a roadmap item due for completion in MATE 1.10 and a precursor to adding Wayland support.

“I can only imagine that the Operating System U team are about to submit some massive pull-requests to the MATE project what with the ‘CEO’ proclaiming to be such an Open Source enthusiast. If Operating System U are to be taken seriously I’d like to see some proper community engagement first.”

Proper community engagement — what a concept!

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

But wait . . .

May 26, 2014 3 comments

To be honest, I’m not really obsessed with this topic; at least I’m not paying as much attention to Ubuntu/Canonical’s replacing Jono Bacon as people think I am. But a wide variety of people — from those who consider me detestable scum (single file, folks, one at a time) to those who either are, or think they are, giving me inside information — have not been shy about sharing what they know or what they suspect.

You might think that I would say, “Stop,” but it’s all somewhat interesting, in the same way watching two hockey players converging on a puck near the board is interesting. Interesting, but not terribly important.

But one thing that popped up on the radar late last night/early this morning is that Jono Bacon could be “irreplaceable” in Canonical’s eyes. That is, the scenario presented is that Jono’s position would not be filled, and the “community leader” would be a committee with the newly minted Ubuntu Community Liaison position (previously referred to as the “monkey boy” position) being the go-between between the Inner Party at Canonical and the Outer Party of what’s left of the community.

Draw your own conclusions about how this particular scenario translates to Ubuntu’s commitment to community.

But it’s an interesting scenario, to be sure: Certainly better than the one where Mark Shuttleworth takes over as Community Leader as a cost-cutting move (don’t laugh, that was sent to me as a scenario).

One more thing. To those who laughably think they’re getting a dig in by asking me why I’m not focusing on who’s replacing Robyn Bergeron as the Fedora Project Leader, here’s why I’m not really too concerned about that.

If I were a betting man, my money would be on Tom Callaway to be the next Fedora Project Leader. He is a natural choice, and he’ll be a fantastic choice to lead Fedora, a distro that on every level, in every facet of development and community, does things right.

Remember where you heard it first.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Will Canonical name a new Pope?

May 25, 2014 9 comments

Bryan Lunduke, who can best be described as one of Linux/FOSS’s top raconteurs (though others have described him to me otherwise, unfairly I would say), wrote what can be described as a moving tribute to Jono Bacon wrapped in his look back — and forward — for Ubuntu.

The problem with a glowing tribute wrapped in this kind of subjective analysis, without challenge, is that it likely becomes history when all facts aren’t represented. The most poignant example of why other voices and expanding on facts is necessary: When a story broke a couple of years ago that the computers at CERN run Linux, that overwhelming story somehow became the computers at CERN run Ubuntu, and years from now people could look back and make this fact rather than fiction.

So let’s set the record straight on that one: At CERN, the heavy metal that runs the important stuff runs on Scientific Linux. Higgs Boson was discvered in large part thanks to Scientific Linux, and Ubuntu is not within several light-years of being a factor. And that, friends, is what history should reflect, not the results of a bunch of “gee-whiz” posts saying Ubuntu discovered Higgs Boson.

So it stands to reason that Bryan’s assessment will carry a lot of weight over time, but I’d like to add a footnote or two going forward.

When he writes that “Ubuntu has, over the last several years, captured significant market share, especially in the consumer-oriented Linux space. I would posit that a big reason for that is Jono,” Lunduke hits the bulls-eye. If he does nothing else for the rest of his life, Jono’s accomplishments at Ubuntu would be a huge legacy which many, including me, find awe-inspiring and unequivocally admirable.

However — and you knew that was coming — there’s this, almost in the same proverbial breath: “. . . Mark Shuttleworth (who has acted as a sort of elder statesman for the project, aka “Self Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life”) and Jono Bacon (who has, in many ways, played the role of the mascot).”

Nope. It should be, ” . . . Mark Shuttleworth (who has acted as a sort of arsonist) and Jono Bacon (who has, in every way, played the role of the fireman).”

Bryan, Shuttleworth a “statesman”? If the synonym for “statesman” is “douchebag,” then again you’re right on target.

Sadly, Bryan has his Wile E. Coyote moment in this piece comes when he compares what I guess is Jono Bacon’s visibility to the leaders of the Fedora Project when he asks, “When you think of, say, Fedora, who do you think of?”

Well, Bryan, I think of Greg DeKoenigsberg, the Fedora Project Leader who got the ball rolling around Fedora Core 5 — as it was called back then — and who is now providing the same outstanding leadership at Eucalyptus. I also think of Max Spevack, who took FOSS leadership to a new level before ending up at Amazon. I think of the steady guidance and innovative changes under the leadership of Paul Frields and Jared Smith, and the cool-headed organizational skills and problem-solving abilities that Robyn Bergeron — the first woman to lead a distro — provided in some of the rough waters she faced during her tenure.

So “when I think of, say, Fedora,” Bryan — or “when I think of, say, Debian or OpenSUSE” — I think of people who get the job done and leave their distro, and the wider FOSS landscape, a better place without monopolizing the limelight or pilfering undue credit. No star value among their ranks, to be sure. Just accomplishments. Arguably, Jono did more for Ubuntu than “be a star,” but when you invite this kind of comparison, Bryan, that’s what you end up with.

Arguably it would appear that Bryan’s point here is that while Fedora, OpenSUSE, Debian and other distros have been doing the heavy lifting for Linux and FOSS, Jono and Ubuntu have been basking in the warm glow of the spotlight.

I would agree with that 100 percent.

Nevertheless, the understudy now becomes the focus: The decision to replace Jono will be a remarkably important one for Canonical to keep whatever momentum they have, despite Shuttleworth’s hubris-based attempts to derail it.

No one with two brain cells to rub together thought for a split second that I’d be replacing Jono Bacon. Apparently, some of you completely missed the satire here. Of course, if they had completely lost it in the upper echelons of Canonical (well, they may have already, but speaking solely on the issue of replacing Jono Bacon) and decided to hire me, it would be my duty to turn them down, and I would. I also would have turned them down if they offered me the applied-for Canonical position of monkey boy to the Community Leader, however for the record Canonical beat me to it, wiping the last tears of laughter from their eyes before writing the standard rejection note, no doubt.

So who should replace Jono?

My choice, and I hope it’s not el beso de la muerte (that’s the kiss of death, to those who don’t speak Spanish) for me to say it, is California LoCo leader Nathan Haines, who I’ve mentioned in an earlier blog post. Again, I have known Nathan for years and he has been an eloquent advocate and steady leader in the California LoCo for quite some time. There are few in FOSS for which I have as much respect as I do for Nathan, and his leadership skills are top-notch. If Canonical misses the chance to hire Nathan as their Community Leader, they should at least — at the ultimate very least — make him the Community Leader’s monkey boy.

But after thinking about it for awhile, my guess is that Jono’s successor will be Alan Pope, Canonical’s engineering manager, podcaster and all-around good guy. He may not be able to play electric guitar as well as Jono Bacon, but he has the right stuff — for example, a likeable demeanor and a knack for diplomacy for starters, and the same ability to perform the same foot-from-mouth extraction that Jono always performed on Shuttleworth. He would be a good fit for Ubuntu.

So the question becomes this: Are we going to see white smoke from the chimneys at Canonical if they elect Pope?

But wait, there’s more . . . .

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Yes, I did that

May 20, 2014 13 comments

No, I have not lost my mind (assuming I had one in the first place). No, I have neither had a change of heart nor have I turned my coat traitorously in doing what I’m about to tell you.

But yes, I applied on the Canonical web site to replace Jono Bacon as Ubuntu’s Community Leader. Now while I wait for the laughter to die down, and while quite possibly Mark Shuttleworth is laughing himself into a new pair of underwear somewhere on the Isle of Man, I should say that I am serious about my qualifications for this position, as outlined in my resume and cover letter.

No one realizes more than I do that I would need a massive cold front to move into hell rather quickly, freezing it over and providing ideal ski conditions, before I have anything resembling a remote chance for the distant possibility of being mildly considered for this stellar position. I get that, and despite the fact there are others who are qualified who might have an advantage in loyalty to Ubuntu and Canonical, I don’t think my qualifications pale in the least.

But as someone who has praised Ubuntu/Canonical when it was warranted, and pointed out the multiplicity of flaws when they’ve raised their ugly heads, I can say that — agree or not — I have always been honest in my commentary and observations about the distro and its community. Frankly, I don’t care that some consider me a pariah — that for years I’ve been considered by some like the evil wrestler playing havoc on the heroic fan favorite in the ring — because I live to a higher standard that Polonius eloquently nailed in “Hamlet” when he said the following:

“This, above all: to thine own self be true.”

So I don’t find it ironic or hypocritical that I’m applying. Nor do I find it hyperbolic when I say that my qualifications clearly meet and exceed the position being vacated by Jono Bacon. My sincere hope is that the next Ubuntu Community Leader adequately fills Bacon’s humongous shoes — who I think could do that, other than me, follows — and Canonical would be well advised to look outside its ivory tower (and, by the way, it could do worse in not hiring me). I am not a yes-man, and my guess is that Bacon and Mark Shuttleworth are surrounded by them already.

But enough about me.

Jono Bacon’s departure leaves a fairly significant vacuum and there are a few people who, off the top of my head, would excel at this.

If I were Mark Shuttleworth — and he and the Ubuntu Community no doubt regularly breathe a huge sigh of relief that I’m not (as do I, believe me) — I would pay a king’s ransom to Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph, who would absolutely nail it if her community work over the last several years is any indication. She is seemingly tireless in her advocacy and her ubiquity when it comes to being a mainstay at just about every Linux/FOSS event — large or small, whether as a keynoter or a speaker, a booth staffer, or even a speaker to smaller groups — is unparalleled. However, in talking with her this morning, she said she’s happy on the software side of things and wants to stay put.

Pity. Elizabeth has a uniting presence which would serve Ubuntu well during transitional, and arguably difficult, times.

My next draft choice would be Nathan Haines, whom I have known for years and who has been an eloquent advocate and steady leader in the California LoCo for quite some time. Nathan and I have sparred, locked horns, and debated many FOSS/Ubuntu issues over the years, and while we may not ultimately sway each other in the end, he has always been civil and smart in his arguments, and he understands a concept — lost on many — that people can disagree without being disagreeable. There are few in FOSS for which I have as much respect as I do for Nathan, and his leadership skills are top-notch.

Another name that keeps coming up is Mark Terranova. Many might consider Mark as FOSS’s “court jester,” and not being above putting on the Linux penguin suit or the “Beefy Miracle” hot dog suit in the cause of promoting FOSS clearly shows there is no one more passionate than Mark in promoting the open source ideal, both inside and outside the digital realm. What many don’t know about Mark is that he also possesses a wealth of organizational talent to go along with an above-average eloquence behind the podium. Mark’s advocacy has stretched across a matrix of different distros, and that would be a plus in this case.

Chances are Canonical will be hiring from within to fill Jono’s position. My fondest hope is that they pick someone from the wider community, rather than pick someone from the “Inner Party,” to invoke Orwell. I am hoping Nathan and Mark have both applied, and I hope Nathan and Mark are being considered.

And I hope they even pause from laughter momentarily to consider the guy who browbeats them into living up to the lofty FOSS ideal. I would certainly appreciate that.

Oh, before I forget: Here are the hashtags — #TeamMark for discussion about Mark Terranova being Ubuntu’s Community Leader; #NathanTheNewJono for Nathan Haines getting the post; and #TeamLarry for yours truly.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy, Fosstafarian, Larry the Korora Guy, and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Halting the hiatus

June 23, 2013 1 comment

I got an e-mail from a friend and a long-time reader who observed the following:

“Hey FSG (assuming, I hope, that means Free Software Guy, though Flying Spaghetti Guy would also work for me) — You haven’t posted a blog item in over a month. Everything OK?”

Signed, “Sincerely, Mark Shuttleworth.”

OK, so I made up the last part: It wasn’t from The Mark, but someone apparently missed me enough to write.

I’ve mentioned this before: I don’t like to write just to fill space or to hear myself speak. In fact, I don’t like hearing myself speak, but that’s another subject for another time. So when I put pixels to screen, at least, I want to make sure I have something worth saying and, more importantly, something worth reading. Combine this with a life that varies in complexity from time to time (not a complaint), and I have to plead guilty to not being consistent in posting here.

Mea culpa, folks.

So to fix that, I’m setting up a schedule: Every Sunday, you’ll be seeing a Larry the Free Software Guy blog post, under the grand assumption that during the course of the week something will happen for me to comment upon by Sunday. Of course, if the lightning of inspiration strikes during the course of the week, I’ll write then as well. But count on Sundays starting next week.

Earlier today, I wrote this Larry the CrunchBang Guy post, which addresses distro-hopping — a good thing, in the grand scheme of the FOSS paradigm — and where to go to find information (hint: Go to forums, not social media). The only other thing worth mentioning over the last couple of weeks was Bruce Byfield’s reasoned observations in response to the uncharacteristically ludicrous article posted by the usually right-on-the-mark FOSSForce.com site earlier this month regarding what constitutes a community distro.

Oh, and one more thing: Fedora 19, Schrodinger’s Cat, is coming soon. Or it’s not.

See you next Sunday.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Was it something I said?

October 18, 2012 21 comments

Leave it to Ubuntu/Canonical’s Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life Mark Shuttleworth to completely ruin a perfectly good release day for Ubuntu 12.10 and its arguably superior derivatives like Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu and Edubuntu.

Don’t take my word for it. I’ll let this article from TechCrunch with the headline “Canonical’s Mark Shuttleworth Tires Of Critics, Moves Key Ubuntu Developments Out Of Public Eye” tell the tale.

Was it something I said?

Of course, there’s something both fundamentally and tragically wrong — bordering on criminally wrong — about any Free/Open Source Software project moving their “developments out of the public eye.” But let’s put that aside for a moment, because Shuttleworth writes in his blog that ” . . . we thought we would extend the invitation to people who trust us and in whom we have reason to trust, to work together on some sexy 13.04 surprises.”

So, not only is Shuttleworth throwing out the FOSS baby with the bath water, he also wants to provide a caste system that either patterns itself after the Inner Party/Outer Party in George Orwell’s “1984,” or takes a page from Orwell’s “Animal Farm” where, to paraphrase, “All developers are equal, but some are more equal than others.”

If you’re an Ubuntu contributor, how can you be sure you’ll be one of “the chosen ones,” and if you’re not, then why not?

To take a step back, the more fundamental question is this: Is this really how a Free/Open Source Software project should conduct itself?

I would say the answer to this question is an unequivocal “no,” and I would also add that, at this point, the direction that Mark Shuttleworth has taken Ubuntu is light-years off course from its original mission.

This goes beyond burying “Linux” on a second- or third-tier page on the Ubuntu site. This clearly goes beyond Shuttleworth’s treating current Ubuntu users as second class citizens while he chases the elusive Holy Grail of converting “the new users.”

This is betrayal.

So while the Ubuntu Apocalypse lines up to march, zombie-like, to take their shots below in the comments, I’d like to ask them to first look in a mirror and ask themselves if this is truly what they bought into when getting involved with FOSS. And while admiring what you see in the mirror, I’d like to offer a solution to right this ship that’s listing under the weight of gross misdirection.

To right this ship, the principled and noble thing to do would be for Mark Shuttleworth to turn over the keys to Ubuntu to Jono Bacon, the Community Manager for Ubuntu, and make Jono the Ubuntu Project Leader. Mark should resign from all Ubuntu community-related posts and concentrate on the corporate side of things, where he excels.

I don’t always agree with Jono, but his commitment to FOSS is nothing short of impeccable, and his commitment to these principles is completely unimpeachable. He has the wisdom and experience to bring Ubuntu back to where it should be.

Though this wouldn’t happen in either Mark’s, Jono’s or my lifetime, it would be a step that would go a long way in restoring my faith in Ubuntu’s commitment to FOSS.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to install Xubuntu 12.10 and put it through its paces.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Paul Venezia and Etienne Perot nail it

October 8, 2012 1 comment

Well, I didn’t write this, but it bears repeating. In an InfoWorld blog item, Paul Venezia pretty much explains why the Amazon thing is not Ubuntu’s biggest problem. Rather than paraphrase, I’ll let you read it on your own:

http://www.infoworld.com/d/data-center/ubuntu-has-bigger-problem-its-amazon-blunder-203467

Best quote: “But the biggest problem I have with the Amazon debacle is another comment by Shuttleworth: “Don’t trust us? Erm, we have root. You do trust us with your data already.” That level of hubris from the founder of Ubuntu, in the face of what is clearly a bad idea badly implemented, should leave everyone with a bad taste in their mouth. If this idea can make it to the next Ubuntu release, then what other bad ideas are floating around? What’s next? Why should we maintain that trust?”

Indeed.

Further, and quoted in the blog above, Etienne Perot outlines what a mess this is — and how to get out of it — in a post from a few weeks ago here:

https://perot.me/ubuntu-privacy-blunder-over-amazon-ads-continues

One of the solutions: See “Step 3: Make it opt-in, rather than opt-out”.

Canonical, white courtesy phone . . .

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Eliminate DRM!

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