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Posts Tagged ‘REGLUE’

How it’s done

April 9, 2013 2 comments

I haven’t tried SolusOS yet — it’s on my list of things to do and, without casting aspersions on its list-ranking because I really have a lot to do on a daily basis, it’s somewhere in the 40s on my list of things to do and I’m still on, oh, Number 11 at the moment.

However, people I trust about these things — Ken Starks at Reglue, in particular — loves this distro and his word is as good as gold. So if he says that SolusOS is a good distro, you can bank on it being so.

Ikey Doherty, the lead developer for SolusOS, posted a brief blog item today saying that they’re going back “to the old ways” from releasing planned ISOs. Instead they’re going to put out frequent releases for testing in order to restore the sense of everyone working together as a community.

Transparency: That’s how it’s done here in the FOSS paradigm. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to try making a dent in this list in order to get to trying out SolusOS.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Sometimes the good guys win

November 16, 2012 2 comments

If anyone asks, Ken Starks will tell you this is why you fight whatever misfortune life throws at you, no matter how difficult or heinous, while giving it everything you have and then some.

Because you might just end up prevailing.

Make no mistake: Ken still fights with some health issues. He still lives with his “scarlet letter” — his term, not mine — of having a PVC pipe in his throat and he’s still going to have to receive treatments in the near future that are going to cost into the thousands per, in order to keep ahead of the cancerous curve.

But the throat cancer, which was supposed to log him out for good, is now in remission.

So he lives to fight the good fight another day, and that means bringing technology, powered by Linux, to underprivileged kids in the Austin area thanks to his work with REGLUE.

It means that an eloquent and vocal supporter of Free/Open Source Software, silenced slightly by his previous surgery (his voice is a cross between Don Corleone and Animal on The Muppets, he says), continues to air his opinion, at full blast, on his well-written blog.

It means that one of the good guys — one of the white hats — won.

One more thing: It also means that he gets to go through another ordeal . . . I mean, another Houston Astros season next year. The Astros, now in the American League West, take on a new group of rivals next season, like the Oakland Athletics (and he’s welcome to come out here to California next season to see the Astros-A’s at the Coliseum).

I left Ken on a warm Friday morning in Houston to head back to California after the Giants-Astros series in August. I never told anyone, but I have to confess to having creeping doubts about whether I’d see him again.

Leave it to him to prove me wrong, and I can tell you how he’ll respond: He’ll just chalk it up to my being a liberal. Honest. Then we’ll laugh about that — the tree-hugging Californian and the rock-ribbed conservative Texan — and we’ll move on to the next FOSS issue we’ll be addressing together.

Thanks for getting the better of your disease, Ken. I know I speak for a multitude of folks who would echo that sentiment, and I know an army of folks who are glad you’re on our side in fighting proprietary software.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Back to the future

October 29, 2012 5 comments

[This item, slightly edited, is copied from an earlier submission to the Larry the CrunchBang Guy blog.]

Unbeknown to my daughter Mimi — and, sadly, I don’t think she reads what her Dad writes in this blog often enough (and if she does, well, consider the surprise spoiled) — she’s about to inherit yet another of Dad’s hand-me-down computers.

First things first: I currently use a ZaReason Alto 3880 laptop running CrunchBang 10 Statler, which is a remarkable machine that, sadly, ZaReason doesn’t make anymore — time and improvements march on, and ZaReason has advanced this laptop series to the current Alto 4330.

My daughter, conversely, has been using for the past few years my old ThinkPad R40, a very sturdy, utilitaran and well-traveled laptop judging by all the stickers on the cover.

Enter a new development: Steam and Valve are ramping up gaming in Linux, and the old R40 — great for her artwork and creating 8-bit music, which takes up most of her digital life — has, well, performance issues when it comes to the higher horsepower needed for games. Her interest in games goes beyond playing them, and with this in mind, I’d like for her to have the better hardware when pitching in on the projects she wants to explore.

Personally, I blame Gabe Newell for Mimi wanting newer hardware, but never mind. Also, for those of you keeping score at home, shelling out for a new ZaReason laptop is out of the question until, at least, Christmas (especially after last week’s $600 car repair which we will not discuss. Ever).

So after saving a ThinkPad T42 from recycling doom recently, I’ve put Waldorf on it — the CrunchBang-11-20121015-i686 version, which works flawlessly (with one caveat, mentioned below) — and I’ll hand down the ZaReason to Mimi.

Now, you go girl.

In the past in other blogs, I’ve said that I am a ThinkPad guy and I have always loved the form factor. That hasn’t changed, and though I’m turning over the keys to the sports car to my daughter and relegating myself to the station wagon, I feel at home with almost any model of ThinkPad.

So back to the hardware I love while looking to the future.

One more thing: There have been installation issues in the past with Waldorf — and, for some reason, it seems to be happening mostly (if not solely) on ThinkPads — where the installation will hang at the “detect disks” point. It came up again yesterday with this current install, and while there’s an extensive discussion involving solutions here, my solution was more simple and straightforward: Disable floppy in the BIOS.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

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