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Posts Tagged ‘GNU/Linux’

Getting the show on the road

December 9, 2013 2 comments

While we’re approaching mid-December, it would be prudent for me to point out that preparations have been under way for several weeks now for the Southern California Linux Expo, known this year as SCALE 12X.

You’ve heard me brag about the fact that SCALE, now in its 12th year, is the largest community-run Linux/FOSS show in North America. You’ve heard me repeatedly state that it’s the first-of-the-year Linux/FOSS show on this continent as well. I could say that I do it because I’m the publicity chairperson of the event. But even if I didn’t hold that position, I’d still say it.

It’s by far the one Linux/FOSS event of the year I look forward to most and the one around which I plan my year. It’s like in NASCAR, the biggest race of the year — the Daytona 500 — is first and kicks off the season. Going forward, I should also give fair warning to shows and expos east of the Rockies: I plan to submit presentations and make it to as many shows as possible in 2014, even if — gasp! — I have to get to second base with TSA agents and actually board an airliner to accomplish this.

But let’s put that tortuous visual aside for now.

As the SCALE Team starts putting together the 12th annual show, I should point out to readers that the Call for Papers closes six days from today’s writing — we’re at Dec. 9, by my calendar, so that means at midnight Pacific Standard Time on Dec. 15, your proposal will turn into a pumpkin if you haven’t submitted it. And you should — with the wide range of topics proposed in this informational link, you should have no problems finding an audience for your talk.

Want to be a sponsor at SCALE 12X? Easy enough: Send an e-mail to sponsorship-at-socallinux-dot-org (not using an e-mail link because, well, you know) and someone will help you out with that. Are you a dot-org and/or a nonprofit and want a booth? Gareth Greenaway is your man at gareth-at-socallinuxexpo-dot-org — drop him a line and say that Larry the Free Software Guy sent you.

Maybe you’re not presenting and maybe you’re not sponsoring and/or hosting a booth of your own, but there are two other things you can do.

The first thing you can do is attend. Yep, like life itself, 90 percent of attending SCALE 12X is just showing up — and, like life, it’s what you do with the other 10 percent that counts. Registration is now open by going here.

Want to help? We can always use it and we can always utilize a wide range of talents. Tell us what you can do and there’s a good chance we can find a place for you on the SCALE Team. E-mail us at staff-at-socallinuxexpo-dot-org

It’s a huge team effort every year that makes SCALE, and all the other shows around the continent (or, for that matter, the world), work.

You’ll be hearing more about SCALE on this blog going forward. And I look forward to seeing you all in February.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

Random Tuesday thoughts

December 3, 2013 2 comments

Not being one to let the calendar get in the way of when I post, I had a few random thoughts after visiting the normal digital hangouts and haunts during the course of an increasingly cold Tuesday. Like . . .

FOSDEM’s seeking a few good distros: Joe Brockmeier passed along to me a message about FOSDEM hosting a cross-distribution miniconference on Feb. 1-2, 2014, seeking submissions of talks, Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions, or round-table discussions from any interested representatives of Linux distributions or individuals who have a topic of interest related to Linux distributions. Got a proposal? Go here and submit it through Pentabarf, the FOSDEM proposal system (though it would be a good idea to check with Joe first — Joe outlines all of this here on his blog). Good luck in Brussels!

Test, test . . . is this thing on?: Chris Smart, the lead developer at Korora, is looking for a little help in testing Pharlap, a new driver manager for Fedora and a replacement for Jockey in the next version of Korora. Pharlap is shipping with Korora 20, and Smart hopes to get it into RPMFusion down the line, but it needs some testing. He talks about it in his blog, and if you have the time, the skills and the inclination, you might want to help out.

Unicorns, the Loch Ness Monster, Ubuntu TV: One of these things is not like the others. Oh, wait: They’re all alike. Christopher Tozzi, whom many of you know as The VAR Guy, talks to Canonical in his latest item, “Canonical: Ubuntu TV Lives, But Linux Smartphones Come First.” The definition of “life” being broad as it might be, yours truly still would like to call shenanigans with impunity on the folks from the Isle of Man. Why? Simple: Canonical featured Ubuntu TV last year (2012, for those of you keeping score at home) at CES — not a small, inexpensive venue for a coming-out party — and now Jono Bacon follows up with a quote in the article that Ubuntu TV is “still not as complete as we liked it to be” nearly two years after the fact. If Ubuntu TV lives, that’s really not much of an existence, is it?

One more thing: The Linux Journal Readers’ Choice Awards are out. Not a lot of surprises, but something that deserves special mention is Aaron Seigo reflections on KDE’s excellent showing — a leader at 30.6 percent, putting together votes for KDE and KDE Plasma — in the Desktop Environment category.

See you Sunday, if not before (and Felton LUG members, bear in mind there’s no meeting this Sunday. Enjoy the yuletide holiday instead and see you in January).

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

VSIDO makes its mark

December 2, 2013 4 comments

Back in March, I had a chance to take a lap or two with Terry Ganus’ VSIDO and wrote about it here. I liked what he was doing — revealing that Debian Sid is not the monster some people make it out to be while proving that it could be used by the average user as a daily distro. Also, I liked the offering back then when it came out.

I gave VSIDO another shot last week, using the 64-bit Raptor, which features Debian Sid under the hood with the Fluxbox window manager on the surface. I ran it on a dual-core Toshiba laptop. Like in March, again I found it a solid distribution which would serve any user well.

A word about Fluxbox: It’s a good call to make this the default window manager. Like CrunchBang’s Openbox window manager, Fluxbox is very lightweight, however the advantage over Openbox is that it does not share Openbox’s starkness. For those who like a little color in their menus, not to mention a lot of flexibility in tweaking their window manager, Fluxbox is an outstanding option.

The lineup of software available also sets VSIDO apart. There’s the standard programs you’d find in Debian-based systems augmented by other programs which are not as well known but are adequately solid. For example, Audacity is present, but there’s also a video viewer called UMPlayer that gives any other player a run for its money. Ceni and WICD star as the network managers (more on this later). There are even a couple of things you may not find on regular distros — Filezilla comes immediately to mind, as well as menu-ized items like the htop command to easily keep track of what’s running on your system.

All of this shows that a lot of thought was put into what VSIDO users might want, and the choices are right on the mark.

One thing that I encountered last time that I encountered again, and I know this is PEBCAK moreso than a reflection on the distro: I have always fought a losing battle with WICD, and this time was no exception. This is not unique to VSIDO, because I’ve lost this battle on other distros as well. White flag, surrender — c’est la guerre. Ceni, on the other hand, came in handy and saved the day when using wireless. I don’t know what the logic is behind having two network managers — and I’m glad to be enlightened here by the VSIDO crew — but this redundancy saved the proverbial bacon this time.

A lot can be said for distros like VSIDO, most of which renders moot those ludicrous complaints about there being too many distros in the FOSS universe. There are currently the right number of distros — as many distros as the market will bear, to echo Adam Smith — and the good ones rise in direct proportion to their commitment to quality.

VSIDO is one of those rising in the Debian constellation. If VSIDO continues on its current course, it has a bright future.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

(Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and develops business software at Redwood Digital Research, a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment.)

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Eliminate DRM!

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